Skip to main content
Hydrogen News

Our climate emergency requires huge amounts of green hydrogen

By September 29, 2021December 16th, 2021No Comments

News Stories

Our climate emergency requires huge amounts of green hydrogen

Sep 29, 2021 • Nikkei Asia

Green hydrogen provides unmatched potential to address emissions from hard-to-abate sectors like steel, cement and fertilizer production and heavy-duty transport, which together account for nearly one-third of global CO2 emissions

An opinion post by Malcolm Turnbull, the 29th Prime Minister of Australia (2015-18), Chairman of Fortescue Futures Industries (FFI), and inaugural chair of the Green Hydrogen Organization (GH2), and Andrew Forrest, CEO of Fortescue Metals Group and a founding member of GH2, an organization formed with the goal of dramatically accelerating the uptake of green hydrogen to rapidly decarbonize industries like steel, cement, fertilizers, shipping and aviation.

In the piece, Turnbull and Forrest contend that to address climate change, renewable energy and green hydrogen must be prioritized where the electric grid or batteries cannot reach – which accounts for about 50% of the world’s energy and products. They state “not all hydrogen is the same. Blue hydrogen, which is produced from gas or coal, or with electricity generated by burning gas or coal, has nothing clean or green about it.”

Heavy industries like steel, cement and fertilizer production and heavy-duty transport, such as shipping, trucking and aviation, together account for nearly one-third of global CO2 emissions, which is expected to double under some business-as-usual scenarios. Green hydrogen’s versatility as a store of renewable energy, a clean-burning fuel and a chemical feedstock for industrial processes provides unmatched potential to address emissions from these hard-to-abate sectors and help decarbonize the global economy.
Carbon capture and storage has received billions of dollars in support over the past two decades. “There were high hopes for it,” they contend, “but it has failed to meet expectations on almost every occasion, and the most recent attempts have been some of the worst. Green hydrogen will soon be more cost-effective anyway. We do not have time to invest precious attention and resources into false solutions.”

They add that conversion of renewable energy resources to green hydrogen in portions of the developing world where vast populations exist below the poverty line, is an excellent way to democratize economic growth and provide enormous wealth creation and employment opportunities within these countries.

Continue to fulll article at Nikkei Asia